Darling Companion

Saturday, October 01 st, 2016 at 00:10 am 

Darling Companion

JOY REVIEW

Darling Companion is a film by Lawrence Kasdan, who of course has done fabulous movies for thousands of years, including Body Heat, Big Chill, Wyatt Earp, and he co-wrote Raiders of the Lost Ark. So, this is a big deal guy.  He and his wife co-wrote this and produced it together, and it’s based on a real experience from her life, in which they lost a dog. The reason to see this movie is because of the cast. It’s got Dianne Keaton, Kevin Kline, Dianne Wiest, Richard Jenkins, Elizabeth Moss, Mark Duplass, who is also in My Sister’s Sister, and Sam Shepherd. It’s kind of a sappy story, and you’re not sure exactly why it was made to be quite honest. It’s two different stories. The first revolves around Diane Keaton, who is a woman of a certain age whose first daughter is already married, and has a grandson.  She puts them both on a on plane, and her other daughter, who’s very sympathetic with her, says dad doesn’t pay any attention to you. Dad is Kevin Kline, who’s a sort of vaguely sympathetic, but self-involved surgeon. Is that redundant? Probably. And on the way home from dropping off her grandson, she sees a dog beside the road, and picks the dog up, and takes the dog home against Kevin’s objections. A year later everybody’s in love with the dog. I forgot to tell you, when they take the dog to the vet to find out what’s going on, the vet and the other daughter sort of are crazy about each other and end up getting married. So that’s part one. Part two is Diane and Kevin have the wedding at their mountain lodge in Colorado — I recognized the scenery — and they also invited Kevin’s sister, Diane Wiest and her new boyfriend, Richard Jenkins, who’s got what they view as cockamamie idea about opening an English pub in Omaha; they think he’s after her money. And we have Mark DuPlass, who is Diane’s son, who’s kind of wandering around lost and sort gets a crush on the wedding planner and housekeeper, who is Ayelet Zurer, who is a gypsy. Kevin takes the dog out for a walk, is talking on the cell phone, loses the dog, everybody goes crazy, and decides they have to find the dog. Kevin says he’ll have to go back to his life. The idea is how these couples sort of rediscover their connection with each other and how everybody’s opinion of each other changes. There’s nothing objectionable about it, but you feel like this is a movie that was lost in time in the ’50s or something. The reason to see it is the cast. Diane Keaton is still an adorable personality and can’t act her way out of a paper sack. I’m not sure why they made this movie, but two and a half stars for sentimentality.

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