A PLACE TO LIVE: THE STORY OF TRIANGLE SQUARE

Sunday, December 04 th, 2016 at 00:12 am 

retirement lottery

A PLACE TO LIVE: THE STORY OF TRIANGLE SQUARE

SYNOPSIS

A PLACE TO LIVE chronicles the journey of seven brave individuals as they attempt to secure a home in Triangle Square, Hollywood, the nation’s first affordable housing facility for LGBT seniors. Since demand far exceeds the number of available apartments, a lottery system was set up to determine who would be selected. This film is a moving exploration of the applicants’ personal stories and the journey that brought them to the lottery and what the future might hold

JOY’S REVIEW

I had two feelings about this movie, to be quite honest. What it deals with is a group of aging gays and lesbians in Los Angeles, who want to go to a retirement community that is their kind of people. That’s their term, not mine. What seemed to me a little disingenuous. I mean, I think as everybody gets older, they’re worried about where they’re going to live, and who’s going to take care of them, and being around people that you like. I’m not sure gay and lesbian makes you in a separate community, but this documentary believes that it does. And what they build is this gorgeous place through social activism called the Triangle Square. I’ll tell you what the thing that I walked away with ,   because part of this movie just felt really manipulative and whiny, was why does being gay and lesbian mean you didn’t plan for your retirement? What difference does your sexuality have to do with it, because there’s certainly gays and lesbians who have IRAs and Keoghs and plan for their retirement and yadda, yadda. But I’ll tell you what I walked away with this documentary is how cold and heartless a lottery is. A bunch of documentaries — most of the lotteries have been about young kids and getting into college or getting into a great charter school, but to realize the fact this country has come to the point where we only get really good things by lottery, by luck, is really discouraging and depressing. That’s sort of, I’m sure that was not anybody’s intention of this movie, but that’s we’ve gotten to a point where the good things in life only come if you’re lucky. That somehow seems to be a denial of the American dream. It really drives me crazy. I’ll give the movie a star and a half.

JOY’S METER

1/2